Topics

Explore the relationship between forests and several key themes critical to sustainability and the health of our future ecosystems.

40% of global deforestation is commodity-driven.

40% of global deforestation is commodity-driven.

Production of commodities including beef, soy, palm oil, pulp, paper, energy and minerals, is the leading cause of deforestation. More sustainable commodity production is critical for conserving forests and mitigating climate change.

40% of global deforestation is commodity-driven.

Scroll to discover

Commodities

Natural state

Societies around the world have relied on nearby forests for food, fuel and medicine for thousands of years. Traditional practices like agroforestry, and small-scale and shifting agriculture had a reduced impact on the surrounding environment and generated socioeconomic benefits for local communities.

Natural state
Commodities

Drivers of change

As demand for commodities grows, deforestation from industrial-scale agriculture, illegal harvesting of timber and mining increases. The inability to track where products come from and a lack of consequences for environmental outcomes make it difficult to curb the impacts of these industries.

Drivers of change
Commodities

Compromised state

The unsustainable expansion of commodity production can permanently damage ecosystems, displace local communities, exacerbate climate change and accelerate biodiversity loss.

Compromised state
Commodities

Recovery state

Deforestation-free commodity production is possible. Improved forest monitoring can help companies make more sustainable purchasing decisions, facilitate action against illegal clearing and enable policymakers to create more informed land use allocations.

Recovery state

Topics

Explore the relationship between forests and several key themes critical to sustainability and the health of our future ecosystems.

40% of global deforestation is commodity-driven.

40% of global deforestation is commodity-driven.

Production of commodities including beef, soy, palm oil, pulp, paper, energy and minerals, is the leading cause of deforestation. More sustainable commodity production is critical for conserving forests and mitigating climate change.

40% of global deforestation is commodity-driven.

Scroll to discover

Commodities

Natural state

Societies around the world have relied on nearby forests for food, fuel and medicine for thousands of years. Traditional practices like agroforestry, and small-scale and shifting agriculture had a reduced impact on the surrounding environment and generated socioeconomic benefits for local communities.

Natural state
Commodities

Drivers of change

As demand for commodities grows, deforestation from industrial-scale agriculture, illegal harvesting of timber and mining increases. The inability to track where products come from and a lack of consequences for environmental outcomes make it difficult to curb the impacts of these industries.

Drivers of change
Commodities

Compromised state

The unsustainable expansion of commodity production can permanently damage ecosystems, displace local communities, exacerbate climate change and accelerate biodiversity loss.

Compromised state
Commodities

Recovery state

Deforestation-free commodity production is possible. Improved forest monitoring can help companies make more sustainable purchasing decisions, facilitate action against illegal clearing and enable policymakers to create more informed land use allocations.

Recovery state